Sim’s Treasures

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Over the decade or so that I’ve been a writer I’ve been privileged to meet many collectors, modellers, academics and historians who share my love of the Age of Fighting Sail. They’ve all been generous in giving of their time, and in some instances, allowing me special access to precious artefacts and documents

Admiring a bicorne in Sim’s collection It belonged to a lieutenant during the period 1812-1825. Sadly, his name is lost to history

Admiring a bicorne in Sim’s collection It belonged to a lieutenant during the period 1812-1825 Sadly, his name is lost to history

One such collector is Sim Comfort whose wonderfully eclectic treasure trove of coins, medals, paintings, swords and other naval items has been built up over a many decades. I must admit I found it very hard to disengage from the delights in Sim’s study when I visited!

From Webster Groves, Missouri, Sim joined the US Navy at age 18. The US Naval Security Group sent him to Guam and later to London, where the National Maritime Museum sparked a life-long love affair with British naval history.

Sim with some of his treasures, including Broke’s fighting sword, at a ceremony earlier this year to mark the 200th anniversary of the HMS Shannon and USS Chesapeake incident

Sim with some of his treasures, including Broke’s fighting sword, at a ceremony earlier this year to mark the 200th anniversary of the HMS Shannon and USS Chesapeake engagement

Sim has published a number of fine reprints on naval subjects, including David Steel’s ‘Elements and Practice of Rigging and Seamanship.’ He has also authored two books based on his collection, ‘Forget Me Not’ (a study of naval and maritime engraved coins and plate) and ‘Naval Swords and Dirks’ (British, French and American weapons, 1730-1830).

A new volume on Nelson’s swords will be published next year.

Sim's Catalogue

Sim’s Catalogue

Recently Sim played a major role in setting up a Loan Exhibition of Miniature Naval Portraits, at which many pieces from his collection were shown. With Sim’s kind permission I’m delighted to be able to share the 68-page catalogue. It’s fascinating reading! Contact me on julian@julianstockwin.com and I’ll email you one


Sim’s website

5 Comments on “Sim’s Treasures

  1. Pingback: The Naval Medals of England and most particularly during the Reign of George III | Julian Stockwin

  2. Pingback: BookPick: Lord Nelson’s Swords | Julian Stockwin

  3. Please put me down for a copy of “Sim’s Catalogue.
    Your faithful reader and friend of the sea.

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